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The Dirty Kanza was not Peter Stetina's (Trek - Segafredo) first "alternative racing"—groad, if you will—event but it was his first on Trek's gravel bike.

Stetina raced and won the Belgian Waffle Ride aboard his Trek Madone road bike with 28mm tubeless road tires back in May. With the famed gravel of the Flint Hills much gnarlier and prone cause flats in even the widest tires with the best sidewalls, a road bike was not going to cut it for Stetina at Dirty Kanza.

Following in the footsteps of Sven Nys in 2018, Stetina swapped his Madone for the Checkpoint gravel bike the company released in 2018. Like Nys, Stetina's Checkpoint also got a special paint job to personalize the bike.

Like Sven's bike last year, Stetina's Checkpoint got some custom art. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Like Sven's bike last year, Stetina's Checkpoint got some custom art. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina's Checkpoint proved worthy at last Saturday's race. He was the first man to chase after Colin Strickland (Meteor x Giordana) when the front group broke apart around Mile 140 and went on to finish second, all while enjoying the gravel experience.

Stetina had time for some fun. 2019 Men's Dirty Kanza 200 Gravel Race. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina had time for some fun. 2019 Men's Dirty Kanza 200 Gravel Race. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Today, we take a look at Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike from right after his 10-hour day in the Flint Hills.

Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Peter Stetina's 2019 DK200 Trek Checkpoint

Trek entered the gravel bike market last spring when it released the Checkpoint. When we spoke with Trek last year, the company said the bike is based around the Boone cyclocross bike geometry, albeit with more clearance.

The head tube angle on the Checkpoint is a tad steeper than the Boone and the BB drops a bit further down. The stack on the Checkpoint is a smidge higher, while the two bikes have similar wheelbases.

The biggest departure from the Boone with the Checkpoint is tire clearance. The Boone maybe has room for 700c x 38mm tires, while the Checkpoint is designed to clear tires as wide as 45mm, according to Trek. The extra clearance is achieved in part with a dropped drive-side chainstay.

Stetina ran 700c x 38mm Panaracer GravelKing SK tires. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina ran 700c x 43mm Panaracer GravelKing SK tires. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina was riding a bike built up around the Checkpoint SL frameset. The frameset uses Trek's OCLV 500 carbon, the third-highest grade the company uses. Trek opted to use the IsoSpeed decoupler in the rear only after its testing showed that wider tires provided more compliance than a front IsoSpeed would.

The Checkpoint uses an IsoSpeed decoupler in the rear. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

The Checkpoint uses an IsoSpeed decoupler in the rear. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Custom artwork adorns Stetina's seat tube and fork, paying homage to his Colorado origins, current California home and hobbies and passions. You can read about each of them on Stetina's Instagram page.

Stetina's fork featured custom art work. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina's fork featured custom artwork. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina followed the trend of running a 1x for gravel with a SRAM 1x Red 1 eTap AXS drivetrain. He attached a massive 48t X-Sync chain ring to a SRAM Red 1 AXS Power Meter crankset with Quarq's DZero power meter. While Strickland was cranking away on his 46-11 combo, Stetina had a few extra teeth to work with during his chase.

Stetina attached his 48t X-Sync ring to a Red 1 AXS Power Meter crankset with Quarq's DZero power meter. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina attached his 48t X-Sync ring to a Red 1 AXS Power Meter crankset with Quarq's DZero power meter. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

In the rear, he had a Red 1 eTap AXS derailleur and a 10-33t cassette. Another feature of the Checkpoint is it has the Stranglehold horizontal dropouts that allow for singlespeed converstion. Interestingly, the new Crockett, which was a singlespeed favorite, has dropped the Stranglehold to shed grams while the Checkpoint retains them.

Stetina ran a SRAM Red 1 eTap AXS rear derailleur with a 1x front. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina ran a SRAM Red 1 eTap AXS rear derailleur with a 1x front. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

For his first Dirty Kanza 200, Stetina opted to run aero bars and even celebrated the decision by getting involved in the #aerowhat discussion on the eve of the event.

Peter Stetina got aero during his solo chase of Colin Strickland. 2019 Dirty Kanza 200 Gravel Race. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Peter Stetina got aero during his solo chase of Colin Strickland. 2019 Dirty Kanza 200 Gravel Race. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina ran Bontrager Race Lite Aero Clip-On bars attached to his carbon Race Lite handlebar.

Stetina was on team aero bar with Bontrager Race Lite Clip-Ons. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina was on team aero bar with Bontrager Race Lite Clip-Ons. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

When Stetina teased his Checkpoint on Instagram, it had Bontrager GR1 gravel tires mounted, but on race day Stetina rolled to his second-place finish on 700c x 43mm Panaracer GravelKing SK tires mounted to Bontrager Aeolus Pro 3V TLR Disc Road wheels. The new carbon wheels have a 25mm internal width, making them a good fit for the wide gravel tires Stetina ran.

One advantage Stetina had on the other WorldTour riders at the DK200 is with the Belgian Waffle Ride under his belt, the race was not his first groadeo. Stetina had the 130-mile BWR ride to test out his nutrition and dial his setup for DK.

He used a Bontrager Pro Speed Box on his top tube and an Elite Seat Pack in under his Montrose Pro saddle to carry his emergency gear.

A Pro Speed Box from Bontrager helped Stetina carry all his nutrition needs. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

A Pro Speed Box from Bontrager helped Stetina carry all his nutrition needs. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

He mounted the traditional two bottle cages to the frame, and although the bottles were well-marked, it appears Stetina wound up with one of teammate Kiel Reijnen's bottles at Checkpoint 2.

Stetina opted for two bottle cages and kept them well-organized. It appears he ended up with Kiel Reijnen's bottle at CP 2, however. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina opted for two bottle cages and kept them well-organized. It appears he ended up with Kiel Reijnen's bottle at CP 2, however. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Although road pedals are more his style, Stetina opted to follow Craig Richey's advice and run mountain pedals for the DK200. He used the colorful Bontrager Comp MTB Pedal model that is SPD-compatible.

Stetina used SPD-compatible Bontrager Comp MTB Pedals. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

Stetina used SPD-compatible Bontrager Comp MTB Pedals. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

For more on Stetina's DK200 Checkpoint, see the photo gallery and specs below.

For more from Emporia, see all of our coverage of the 2019 Dirty Kanza 200.

Photo Gallery: Peter Stetina's DK200 Trek Checkpoint

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The Checkpoint uses an IsoSpeed decoupler in the rear. Peter Stetina's Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

The Checkpoint uses an IsoSpeed decoupler in the rear. Peter Stetina’s Trek Checkpoint gravel bike. © Z. Schuster / Cyclocross Magazine

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