Interbike Eye Candy: First Looks at Raleigh’s SSCXWC bike, Fuji’s Altamira CX, and TRP’s RRL Brake Lever

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Interbike’s Outdoor Demo presents opportunities to get a first look – and a first touch – at new products for the 2011 season. And for us cyclocrossers, that 2011 season is now. We snapped hundreds of photos of new products at the Outdoor Demo, and are already backlogged with new cyclocross product highlights before the main show has even begun. First up are two new carbon cyclocross frames from Raleigh and Fuji, along with a new singlespeed/single ring brake lever by TRP.

A New Ride to the Pain Cave: Fuji Altamira CX

What's behind the name? Altamira is the name of a cave near the home base of the Fuji-Servetto cycling team. Cyclocross @ Interbike 2010. © Cyclocross Magazine

The RRL levers are $89.99 and 272 grams. They have hints of both Campagnolo and Shimano styling. Cyclocross, @ Interbike 2010. © Cyclocross Magazine

Fuji has created a new high-end cyclocross bike in the Altamira CX. The name, according to Fuji’s Steven Fairchild, stems from a set of caves near the home base of the Fuji-Servetto team they sponsor. While the frame’s name may have been inspired by a Spanish cave, the frame itself was created with a lot of input by former national champion Mark McCormack, now a regional sales rep for the company.

Fuji has only made 60 framesets of the Altamira CX. Full production will begin next spring, but a lucky few with some coin to spare can choose from the full $5,899 Shimano Dura-Ace equipped 1.0 model, the $3,949 Ultegra-equipped 2.0 model, or a $2,949 frameset (frame, fork, headset, seat collar).

The frame is quite light at 1,000 grams for a 54cm model, but it’s oversized everywhere. The frame boasts a 1.5″ headset lower, a BB86 bottom bracket and even a wider carbon clincher rim by Oval that’s 23mm wide. But the feature that caught our eye? The sculpted chainstay / bottom bracket junction that looks very similar to the Stevens carbon frame we raved about in Issue 7. There’s little horizontal surface area on which mud can collect.

Raleigh Carbonates its SSCXWC Singlespeed Rig

Raleigh continues to add interesting designs and paint jobs to its line-up. Cyclocross @ Interbike 2010. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh continues to add interesting designs and paint jobs to its line-up. Cyclocross @ Interbike 2010. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh rejoins the SSCXWC as a race sponsor, and celebrates the unique “championship” event with another set of limited, singlespeed framesets. This year, the company will manufacture 40 carbon framesets for the Seattle edition of the race, and one lucky buyer of the $1,200 frameset will win a complete bike, equipped with Shimano and Gates Carbon Drive Bits.

The frame is really nothing like the aluminum SSCXWC or High Life models from least year. From the thin, tapered seat stays, to the flattened underside of the top tube, to a new BB30 bottom bracket interface, to a new Enve (formerly Edge Composites) cyclocross fork (not pictured), the frame is a serious cyclocross rig for any one gear fan. The weight is expected to be 1050 grams.

The dropouts are removable, allowing for the Gates carbon belt installation. The paint? Themed with SSCXWC colors, of course.

TRP Leverages Carbon

The RRL levers are $89.99 and 272 grams. They have hints of both Campagnolo and Shimano styling. Cyclocross, @ Interbike 2010. © Cyclocross Magazine

The RRL 272-gram levers have hints of both Campagnolo and Shimano styling. Cyclocross, @ Interbike 2010. © Cyclocross Magazine

TRP adds a new singlespeed (or single ring) brake lever to its line-up with the $89.99 RRL lever. The 272g lever gives another option for singlespeeders, and offers a design that shares elements from a Campagnolo Ergopower lever and a Shimano STI lever. But the most unique feature is perhaps the quick release button on the inside of the lever. A simple push automatically opens the lever for easy tire removal or mud clearance for muddy days. Don’t care about 18 grams?  There’s an aluminum model that will save you $40.

 

 

Cyclocross Magazine, Issue 22, Print and digital subscriptionsHave you subscribed yet? You're missing out if not. Get all-original content and your cyclocross fix throughout the year with a subscription and Issue 23 back copy, with features on Lars van der Haar, Jonathan Page, Elle Anderson and more!
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2 comments
Sam
Sam

The release button is definitely nicer, than CC/Campy, for wheel changes. It automatically disengages when you pull the lever. The hood shape was enough reason for me to order them. Campy Ergo lever shape with the newest Shimano hood shape. It's nice to finally get a long lever WITHOUT a shifter.

Peter Tomjanovich
Peter Tomjanovich

Boy, for a second there I thought you were describing the brake release on all campy (and cane creek campy-lookalike) levers. oh wait, you were. hmmm. not so "unique" then i guess.

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