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The Lost and Found Gravel Grinder near Katerina Nash’s (Clif Pro Team) Truckee home is always a good chance to Czech in with the expat who has long lived in the U.S. Nash traditionally uses the race as a chance to do some distance training while doing some of the climbing and descending the mountain biker in her enjoys.

Nash has had a strong summer thus far, taking the win at the Epic Rides Grand Junction Off-Road and following her second-place finish at the 2018 Lost and Found with a win at last Saturday’s annual gravel grinder in the Sierras.

Nash’s Clif Pro Team has been in a bit of flux in recent years, with the mountain bike program taking on a more domestic focus and Maghalie Rochette departing the cyclocross team to start her solo CX Fever program. The changes have also brought the team a new cyclocross bike.

Last year at Lost and Found, we spotted Nash on the gravel-focused Orbea Terra. Having had a calendar year to get used to the bike, which included a full season of cyclocross racing, we checked back in with Nash to see how she’s settled into the bike in our latest Lost and Found Bike profile.

Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning Orbea Terra.

Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning Orbea Terra.

Katerina Nash’s Lost and Found Orbea Terra Gravel Bike

The Terra is Basque-based Orbea’s cyclocross and gravel frame. Orbea redesigned the platform in 2017 to include flat mount disc brakes, 12mm thru-axles, hidden fender mounts and clearance for tires up to 40mm wide. The frame also incorporates swappable cable stops to allow internal routing of both mechanical and electronic shifting cables.

The redesigned Terra has clearance for tires up to 40mm wide. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

The redesigned Terra has clearance for tires up to 40mm wide, which Nash fit in there for Lost and Found. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

The cyclocross/gravel Terra frame has a 70.5-degree head tube angle, and Nash’s Small frame has a chainstay length of 43cm and wheelbase of 103cm. “It’s a great bike for gravel,” Nash said.

That’s consistent with Orbea’s positioning of the bike, with words like “explore,” “straying from the beaten path,” “all-road,” and of course, “gravel” dotting its marketing material.

Since last year, Nash has changed several of the parts, most notably subbing in an ENVE carbon fork before the start of last year’s ’cross season. Asked her reasoning at Cincinnati Cyclocross, Nash told Cyclocross Magazine that the change was intended to quicken the steering on what is a very slack front end.

The ENVE Cross fork easily clears Nash's 38mm Ramblers. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

The ENVE Cross fork easily clears Nash’s 40mm Ramblers. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

The move also necessitated the installation of an R785 brake caliper for the ENVE’s post mount attachment, rather than the Dura-Ace flat mount caliper found in the rear. Interestingly, and perhaps frustratingly, this setup requires two different models of brake pads.

Nash swapped the fork on her Terra for cross season, hoping to speed up steering. Her ENVE fork uses post mount brakes, and as such she has installed an R785 brake caliper as well. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Nash swapped the fork on her Terra for cyclocross season, hoping to speed up steering. Her ENVE fork uses post mount brakes, and as such she has installed an R785 brake caliper as well. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

The drivetrain components on Nash’s multi-purpose bike are still from Shimano, but this year Nash has opted for a Dura-Ace R9100 crankset rather than the Rotor 3D+ she used in the past. She stuck with the compact 50/34t wide-range gearing despite the change.

Also new is Nash's in series R9100 crankset, which replaces her Rotor equipment. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Also new is Nash’s in-series Dura-Ace R9100 crankset, which replaces her Rotor equipment. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

She also installed a clutch-based RX805 Di2 rear derailleur in place of the Dura-Ace R9150 she used last year. She still has a R9150 Di2 front derailleur.

Nash installed Shimano's RX805 rear derailleur, which features a clutch, to replace the Dura-Ace derailleur she previously used. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Nash installed Shimano’s RX805 rear derailleur, which features a clutch, to replace the Dura-Ace derailleur she previously used. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Wheels mark another change for Nash’s build. Gone are the DT Swiss RC-38 tubeless clinchers, replaced in favor of Stan’s Grail CB7 hoops.

Nash ran Stan's Grail CB7 tubeless-ready tires at this year's Lost and Found. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Nash ran Stan’s Grail CB7 tubeless-ready tires at this year’s Lost and Found. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

After last year’s flats, Nash pumped up the jams a bit, going with 700c x 40mm Maxxis Ramblers in place of last year’s 38s. After running them in the high 30s last year, Nash went with 32psi front and 33psi rear and had better luck in the flat department.

New wheels also mean new rotors, and Nash selected Dura-Ace level RT900 rotors to replace her old XTR RT99.

Nash pumped up to 40mm Maxxis Ramblers this year. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Nash pumped up to 40mm Maxxis Ramblers this year. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Changes also included a move to Crankbrothers Eggbeater  rather than Candy pedals.

While she continues to use Crankbrothers pedals, Nash has chosen the lighter Egg Beaters over her previous Candy 11 pedals. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

While she continues to use Crankbrothers pedals, Nash has chosen the lighter Eggbeater 3 over her previous Candy 11 pedals. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

The majority of her cockpit stayed consistent with last year’s build, with Easton EC90 components represented in the handlebar and seatpost, although she did switch to a Prologo saddle over last year’s Astute Skylite VT and swapped in an Easton EA90 SL stem for last year’s carbon model.

Like all gravel grinders, Lost and Found is largely self-supported, but at about 100 miles, it does not require packing the same amount of gear as the Dirty Kanza 200 or DKXL. To that end, Nash went with a saddle bag and a conspicuous frame pump—or at least we noticed because of her issues with flats last year.

Last year's Lost and Found was marked by flats for Nash. She came prepared with a frame mounted hand pump. Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Last year’s Lost and Found was marked by flats for Nash. She came prepared with a frame mounted hand pump. Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning gravel bike. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

For more on Nash’s Lost and Found gravel setup, see the photo gallery and specs below.

Photo Gallery: Katerina Nash’s Lost and Found Orbea Terra

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Katerina Nash's 2019 Lost and Found-winning Orbea Terra.

Katerina Nash’s 2019 Lost and Found-winning Orbea Terra.

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