Ibis Launches Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike – World Champion Don Myrah Bike Profile – Updated: More Photos

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2013 Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike Launched

by Jordan Villella and Andrew Yee

The Ibis Hakkalugi was first released in 1997 and has gone through some major changes over the years. After enjoying many years as a TIG welded steel steed, the Hakkalugi resurfaced in 2009 as a phlegm-colored carbon fiber do-it-all bike that we reviewed positively in Issue 8.

Don Myrah's Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike with 324 Labs Hydraulic Brakes. ©Cyclocross Mag

Don Myrah’s Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike with 324 Labs Hydraulic Brakes. ©Cyclocross Mag

The Frame:

Ibis has redesigned the Hakkalugi frame to accommodate disc brakes — not just to add disc mounts to the cantilever brake Hakkalugi frame — but to turn the bike into a more race-oriented option. “We are using all new molds for this year, and adding some new features,” Ibis founder Scot Nicol told Cyclocross Magazine. Those changes impact the bottom bracket, head tube, geometry, cable routing and mud clearance, and in the process, look to have addressed every small complaint we had with the original carbon Hakkalugi.

Seatstay Post Mount disc brakes on the Hakkalugi Disc keep the brake further from the heel and allow easier access. ©Cyclocross Magazine

Seatstay Post Mount disc brakes on the Hakkalugi Disc keep the brake further from the heel and allow easier access. ©Cyclocross Magazine

While the non-disc Hakkalugi was constructed from Toray T700 intermediate modulus fiber—not the same high modulus fiber used in the company’s Silk SL road bike, the new Hakkalugi Disc moves to the same high modulus carbon of the skinny tire older brother. “The carbon layup is the same as the Silk SL but there are more layers at areas that may take impact,” says Nicol. What this translates into is an extra layer of carbon added to the top and downtube for greater impact protection, without much weight penalty. Nicol reports that the frame weight for the XL size is less than 1160 grams, and the average frame weight is between 1050 and 1100 grams.

The 2013 Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike features a BB92 Press Fit bottom bracket. ©Cyclocross Magazine

The 2013 Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike features a BB92 Press Fit bottom bracket. ©Cyclocross Magazine

The geometry has been tweaked slightly from the cantilever brake Hakkalugi cyclocross frame. Most notable is the bottom bracket drop, which will now be locked in at 70mm across all sizes, a big difference from the varying 56-64mm bottom bracket drop on non-disc models that we found a bit odd. The Disc frame also differs from the cantilever Hakkalugi frame because it accommodates a tapered steerer and oversized, press fit bottom bracket standard. The fork of choice is the ENVE 1-1/8 to 1-1/2 tapered full carbon disc fork while down below, Ibis has decided to go with a Pressfit BB86 bottom bracket standard. When asked why Ibis selected BB86 as opposed to the more-popular PF30 standard, Nicol said, “We think it has the best combination of stiffness, weight and strength…ease of use, compatibility with Shimano, SRAM, and now King, and we like it aesthetically.”  This choice allows customers to use current Shimano and SRAM GXP cranks.

Mud clearance has also been improved to accommodate up to 38c tires. Perhaps the biggest downer for loyal Ibis followers is the fact that the unique Handjob brake cable housing stop that made the Hakkalugi famous is notably missing from the new Hakkalugi Disc frame. “The Handjob holder is gone for now, but we are still looking for ways to incorporate it,” says Nicol.

The frame retails for $1449.99, with SRAM Rival and Shimano Ultegra builds bringing the bike’s price tag up to $3579.99 and $3699.99, respectively. Both come with the new Shimano cyclocross CX75 mechanical disc brakes.

A Look at Don Myrah’s Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike

Don Myrah on his new 2013 Hakkalugi Disc cyclocross bike with hydraulic disc brakes. ©Cyclocross Magazine

Don Myrah on his new 2013 Hakkalugi Disc cyclocross bike with hydraulic disc brakes. ©Cyclocross Magazine

The Hakkalugi can be seen all over the national and international cyclocross race circuits. Pro Danny Summerhill and the current reigning UCI Masters 45-49 Cyclocross World Champion will be racing the Hakkalugi Disc for the first time this weekend in Ft. Collins. Judy Freeman and four-time Danish National Champion Joachim Parbo are racing the cantilever Hakkalugi  (see a video of Joachim Parbo talk about his new Hakkalugi at Outdoor Demo). Myrah took the new bike out for its first off-road ride on Thursday, and then packed it up for its USGP unveiling that night.

Myrah's second World Title - but first rainbow stripes - displayed on his Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike. ©Cyclocross Magazine

Myrah’s second World Title – but first rainbow stripes – displayed on his Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike. ©Cyclocross Magazine

Don Myrah is a laid-back guy by almost anyone’s account, and in explaining his build, the former pro mountain biker and 1989 World Champion jokes about the difference in level of support of Masters racers from his days as a pro, and now is grateful for anything he gets from sponsors. “We wanted to do a full Shimano build, but we had to scrape together what we had around to get the build done,” said Myrah, who was riding SRAM Red last year but now is on a mostly Shimano build. “I like the crispness of Shimano, but the weight of SRAM Red. Dura-Ace or [Ultegra] Di2 would be nice, but this stuff works fine,” he explained, going over the mix-and-match build of Ultegra 6700 mechanical STI levers, SRAM Rival GXP Crankset and PG-1070 cassette.  When asked about the older Rival cranks, Myrah said he prefers 180mm cranks, which are hard to find, and thus he used an old set.

The bike rolls on Reynolds’ new 1496g Assault CX disc-brake compatible carbon tubular wheels dressed with Specialized Terra Tubular tires (reviewed in Issue 18). “They seem to have as much grip as the Dugast Rhino, but might be more durable,” Myrah says.

324 Brake Labs' Disc Brake Adapter gives Don Myrah hydraulic braking power - Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike. ©Cyclocross Magazine

324 Brake Labs’ Disc Brake Adapter gives Don Myrah hydraulic braking power – Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike. ©Cyclocross Magazine

Perhaps the most unique aspect of Myrah’s Hakkalugi Disc bike build is his use of the 324 Labs Brake Adapter system that mates mechanical brake levers with Formula’s lightweight R1 hydraulic disc brake. After his initial ride on a muddy evening, Myrah said he was impressed with the power but thought “it will take a few more rides so I can take advantage of the braking power and brake later.” With great technical skills and disc brakes at his disposal, Myrah was hoping for rain and mud in Colorado this weekend, and planned to contest three races: the 45+ race both Saturday and Sunday as well as the 35+ race on Sunday. Full bike specs below the photo galleries.

Don Myrah’s 2013 Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Cyclocross Bike Photo Gallery:

Don Myrah, First Bike Test Ride Photo Gallery:

Don Myrah’s Ibis Hakkalugi Disc Bike Specs:
Frame: Carbon fiber monocoque frame, compression moded carbon dropouts, disc brake compatible (hydraulic or mechanical), 1.5″ Tapered Head Tube, BB86 Press Fit Bottom Bracket, Post Mount rear brake mount. 1150 grams list for XL size
Fork: ENVE Composites CX Disc, 1-1/8″ to 1-1/2″ tapered steerer
Wheels: Reynolds Assault CX carbon tubular disc wheels
Brakes: Formula R1 hydraulic calipers and rotors, mated to 324 Labs Brake Adapter
Shifters: Ultegra 6700
Rear Derailleur: Shimano Ultegra 6700
Front Derailleur: Shimano CX70 top pull
Crankset: SRAM Rival GXP, 180mm with 39/46 chainrings
Cassette: SRAM PG-1070 12-27
Pedals: Crank Brothers Eggbeater 3
Stem: Ibis 3D forged
Handlebar: Ritchey Logic II WCS
Seatpost: Easton EC90 carbon, zero setback
Saddle:  Ritchey WCS Streem V2, Titanium Rails

Retail Model MSRP: $1449.99 frame only, $3579.99 SRAM Rival build, $3699.99 Ultegra build

For more info:  Ibis Cycles website and 324 Labs

 

 

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4 comments
mirceaandreighinea
mirceaandreighinea

i wrote to ibiscycles.com and they said he "rides a 58cm".

so it would be:

Head Tube Length 175

Top Tube Length 570

Seat Tube Angle 73°

Head Tube Angle 71.5°

mirceaandreighinea
mirceaandreighinea

from the pictures, seeing how tall the head tube is, it looks like it's a 550 size.

Head Tube Length     155

Top Tube Length     555

Seat Tube Angle     73°

Head Tube Angle     71.5°

 

can somebody from cxmagazine confirm that?

thank you!

Mircea

topfunky
topfunky

I like the integrated hydraulic line stops on the top tube. That's forward thinking if hydraulic CX brakes become more readily available. Is that stock or only on Don's bike?

 

I'm also curious about how this bike rides. After looking at the geometries of a bunch of other 'cross, road, track, and mountain bikes, it sits in a unique spot.

 

This bike has the most relaxed head tube of any 'cross bike at 71.5 degrees. And the seat tube is pretty far back at 72 degrees. Does it still corner well? Does it ride more like a mountain bike?

 

For comparison, my Van Dessel has a 72.5 degree head tube and a 74 degree seat tube.

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