First Look: Cannondale’s 2015 SuperX and CAADX Cyclocross Bikes – Bye Cantis, Hello Hydraulics

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Cannondale says bye-bye to cantilevers, hello to hydraulic disc brakes for 2015. The company showcased their newest, top-of-the-line cyclocross model, the SuperX Hi-Mod Carbon SRAM Red 22, at Press Camp 2014, and we have a full photo gallery of that bike, as well as exclusive details, photos and pricing on the other six cyclocross models (plus a Synapse disc brake bike that caught our eye).

Cannondale’s newest lineup is also indicative of the way the company imagines the future of cyclocross. All of their 2015 models, from entry-level to dream bike, possess disc brakes—even the $1080 Sora-equipped model. The lack of cantilevers might be a snub to traditional Europeans and retro-grouches, similar to the move Giant made in 2014 with their TCX series, although Cannondale still appears to resist the similar leap to thru-axle systems.

Red 22 hydraulic disc brakes and drivetrain on the flagship model. Cannondale's 2015 Super-X Hi-Mod with Red 22 Hydro R. © Cyclocross Magazine

Red 22 hydraulic disc brakes and drivetrain on the flagship model. Cannondale’s 2015 Super-X Hi-Mod with Red 22 Hydro R. © Cyclocross Magazine

The carbon SuperX line is an all-SRAM, all-hydraulic affair this year, and even the top CAADX aluminum model features hydraulic brakes. The top-of-the-line model, the SuperX Hi-Mod SRAM RED Disc, will be the only bike utilizing the company’s highest grade “high modulus” carbon fiber. This top-shelf model shown above features Red 22 Hydro R levers, Red 22 hydraulic disc brakes, and Red 22 derailleurs.

Cannodale was an early adopter of BB30, and uses it with its ultralight SI crankset. © Cyclocross Magazine

Cannondale was an early adopter of BB30, and uses it with its ultralight SI crankset. © Cyclocross Magazine

A Cannondale SI crankset reportedly shaves weight even over the Red 22 offering, and a Cannondale bar and stem keep the handling responsibilities in house. Up front, the fork offers massive mud clearance, and in the rear it’s almost as good. We estimate 40c tires would fit without a problem, for your burly gravel adventures.

Curious that Cannondale didn't choose the Iron Cross or Grail rims for better burp-free low pressure tubeless use. © Cyclocross Magazine

Curious that Cannondale didn’t choose the Iron Cross or Grail rims for better burp-free low pressure tubeless use. © Cyclocross Magazine

The only curious component choice we noticed on the SuperX Hi-Mod Red 22 was the Alpha 340 rims paired with the excellent Racing Ralph tires. Neither component works well in low pressure tubeless situations in our experience, and the combination is especially problematic. Other NoTubes rims like the Iron Cross and the just-released NoTubes Grail rim, or alternatives from American Classic or Industry Nine would be better cyclocross options if the racer was to want to remove the inner tubes and try tubeless. Still, with inner tubes, as the bikes roll out of shops, the Alpha 340 rim and Schwalbe Racing Ralph tires will do their job well. The SuperX Hi-Mod Red 22 comes with the price tag of $5960.00.

These Red 22 HydroR levers appear to be pre-recall models, but the 2015 bikes will have the new stuff.  © Cyclocross Magazine

Red 22 Hydro R levers will help modulate gearing and braking on the Hi-Mod version. © Cyclocross Magazine

Interestingly enough, it seems as if SRAM’s next generation Hydro R system has impressed the decision-makers at Cannondale. All three of their carbon fiber models come equipped with the technology, all the way from SRAM Red 22 to the new SRAM Rival 22 shown below:

Cannondale SuperX Carbon SRAM Rival 22

Cannondale SuperX Carbon SRAM Rival 22

SRAM must have made quite an impression on companies at home and abroad with their new CX1 system made available this summer.  Not only has Ridley jumped on the single chainring bandwagon with their newly released X-Night 10, but Cannondale has also joined the party with their all new 2015 SuperX Carbon CX1, retailing for $3790.00. The SuperX Carbon SRAM CX1, which is the middle child of Cannondale’s carbon lineup, comes stocked with SRAM Force 22 levers, albeit with the shifting guts on the left lever taken out, and the Force CX1 crankset and Type 2 rear derailleur we reviewed in March.

The Cannondale SuperX CX1 follows the trands toward single chainrings.  Expect to see more like it come cyclocross season.

The Cannondale SuperX CX1 follows the trands toward single chainrings. Expect to see more like it come cyclocross season.

The CAADX line changes up the geometry a bit from years past, still keeping what the company refers to as their “racing heritage with CAAD10 and SuperX inspired tube shapes, SAVE stays and race-bred geometry,” but now includes rack and fender mounts, as well as “a slightly more upright position,” in order to expand usability, and possibly to appeal to those looking for a bike that can go long in gravel grinders as well as take on a serious ’cross season. There’s four models, led by the CAADX Rival 22 model that also features Rival Hydro R DoubleTap levers, Rival 22 HRD hydraulic disc brakes, and retails for $2170.

Cannondale CAADX SRAM Rival 22 Disc

Cannondale CAADX SRAM Rival 22 Disc also features SRAM hydraulic disc brakes

There’s even a patriotic, race-y looking CAADX Tiagra Disc, which retails for just $1350.00:

The less price-y Cannondale CAADX Tiagra Disc

Cannondale CAADX Tiagra Disc

This $2170 aluminum Synapse Rival 22 bike caught our eye. It’s a versatile commuter and wet weather-friendly bike complete with fenders and Rival 22 hydraulic disc brakes. It started as a personal Cannondale project from one of the employees, and has now made it to market.

One of our favorite bikes from the show. Check out the curves on the stays and fork. © Cyclocross Magazine

One of our favorite bikes from the show. Check out the curves on the stays and fork. © Cyclocross Magazine

The green is eye-catching in person, the fork and stays feature some impressive curves, and the matching fenders make for a handsome bike. This model will be made in limited quantities, we’re sure, so bug your dealer now if you have your heart set on one.

 2015 Line-Up Pricing

  • SuperX Hi-Mod SRAM RED Disc $5960.00
  • SuperX Carbon SRAM CX1 $3790.00
  • SuperX Carbon SRAM Rival 22 Disc $2710.00
  • CAADX SRAM Rival 22 Disc $2170.00
  • CAADX 105 Disc $1570.00
  • CAADX Tiagra Disc $1350.00
  • CAADX Sora Disc $1080.00
  • Synapse Rival 22 Disc $2170

More info:  cannondale.com (2015 bikes not listed)

2015 Cannondale Cyclocross Lineup Photo Gallery:


 

 

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25 comments
Jiro Okochi
Jiro Okochi

ディスクもハイドロも、いらないんです。

Bruce Campbell
Bruce Campbell

$1080 buys you Sora and $1350 gets you Tiagra, oh my what bargains. Cantis and QRs make one a "retro-grouch."I'm disappointed "Luddite" wasn't used. With all the commentary below I'm going to take some time and rethink my decision to buy one of each.

Elevenbee
Elevenbee

Is that CAADX Tiagra picture accurate? The 2015 catalog picture I saw was of a black and white paint scheme... the red/blue paint job is for the 2014 isnt' it?

Clint Williams
Clint Williams

Or it went like this: SRAM-"I will give you $$$$$$$$ to put our group on all your bikes." Cannondale-"Where do I sign!?"

Patrick Peoples
Patrick Peoples

So much OEM SRAM hydro. I hope that one doesn't come back to bite Cannondale in the ass.

BTO808
BTO808

Wow, what a mised opportunity. The SuperX is pretty long in the tooth at this point. Also, still no 50cm size?! That is a big gap in their sizing. Either I can have a kids bike or a monster truck.

capitalbiker
capitalbiker

I was really hoping for a whole new SuperX frame design for 2015

Taller headtube would be nice

Internal routing would be nice


The new paint schemes are pretty bright for 2015 though! Id be happy to rock any of those SuperX models thought being one of the lightest Disc frames out there.. 

vbdude43
vbdude43

"Cannodale was an early adopter of BB30".... Don't you mean they invented it...

Julian Meredith
Julian Meredith

More like " import duty " favourable for using SRAM. won't be buying anymore Cannondale Bicycles.

Adam Johnson
Adam Johnson

Good luck with that. My hydraulic disc bike showed up six months late with mech discs.

craigmacintyre
craigmacintyre

Regarding the rim choice on the Superx, I think it was intentional.  Iron Cross rims, though I love them on my bike, have a huge problem - they can only take 40psi.  My thinking is that Cannondale expects this bike to be raced at the highest level and like their road bikes, they are equipping it with a set of wheels that will serve as back up training wheels.  The expectation is that you will run tubbies.  With this choice of rims (and the optional Stan's rim strips) you can run tubeless or tubes for backup cross training and actually run road tires at high psi making them an excellent all around wheel choice ... if you are dropping that kind of coin on a bike, a set of carbon tubulars is probably within reach and choice anyway.

cyclocross
cyclocross moderator

@Elevenbee We asked Cannondale about this and here's what they say, confirming what we have is actually 2014: "[2015] is VERY close to the 2015 Tiagra Disc colorway. The only difference in the paint is the small stripes on the fork, top tube, and chain/seat stays are white on the 2014 and get changed to Lt Blue on the 2015 model." Not sure about your 2015 catalog but they say they 2015 bike hasn't been photographed yet. Hope that helps. 

craigmacintyre
craigmacintyre

@capitalbiker I like tall head tube bikes for the road.  With the frame clearance on these, they have very tall setups.  I had a SUPERX 54, I ride a Synapse 56.  The SuperX was fine size wise.  If the stack was any higher most riders would need to run a negative drop stem to get a good position.

cyclocross
cyclocross moderator

@vbdude43 Actually they're different. We were emphasizing that they were really one of the first companies to use it widely among most of their bikes, including their cx line. They did invent it though, and if you think we should give credit when mentioning BB30, fair input. Inventing and fully adopting something are a little different though! See inverted forks. 

cyclocross
cyclocross moderator

@craigmacintyre fair points! the grail solves that, but is heavier. although if you're buying a top-shelf bike you're also probably going to use it to race cx, and thus by default we'd want the combo to be awesome in cx racing - and that's where the combo isn't. if someone has separate race wheels, it's not a problem. but few people even know about the rim strips, and getting the strips, changing tires, installing valves and sealant - that's a lot more steps than just valves & sealant.

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