BMC was at the show with the new CrossMachine CX01. Many of its frame elements are based on their road models and it’s set up with SRAM Force 1x11 with hydraulic disc brakes. © Christopher Langer

BMC was at the show with the new CrossMachine CX01. Many of its frame elements are based on their road models and it’s set up with SRAM Force 1×11 with hydraulic disc brakes. © Christopher Langer

Our European contributor, Christopher Langer, spent the weekend capturing the latest products and news from Eurobike 2014, which included a new all-around tire from Challenge called the Baby Limus, a look at the cyclocross offerings from Focus and Stevens, as well as an update from Continental Tires, who is looking to take steps in the upcoming year to produce a larger variety of cyclocross tubulars.

At Eurobike 2012, we looked at BMC’s “return” to cyclocross with their release of the 2013 GranFondo GF02 disc, increasing the length of the chainstays and equipping the road model with disc brakes. Keeping a familiar geometry from the GranFondo, BMC made their return official this year, displaying their 2015 CrossMachine CX01.

BMC used their ACE design technology from their TeamMachine SLR01 when creating the CrossMachine. © Christopher Langer

BMC used their ACE design technology from their TeamMachine SLR01 when creating the CrossMachine. © Christopher Langer

Langer told us that the current model on display still had a few design details that needed smoothing over before the CrossMachine CX01 could be considered for production. Much of this could be due to their prototyping process; while the geometry of the CX01 mirrors that of the GranFondo we saw several years ago, the current prototype takes a few of its cues from their TeamMachine SLR01 as both frames have underwent BMC’s newest Accelerated Composites Evolution Technology (ACE) design process.

ACE  is what BMC calls “a reiterative computer modeling program electronically prototyped more than 34,000 possible frame configurations with the goal of optimizing geometry, tube cross sections, carbon lay-up, ride quality, and handling characteristics.”

Langer noticed a few carryovers from prior ACE models, including the space and indentations to accommodate a front derailleur without the mount, which could have also been a last minute change when BMC opted to join the increasing number of companies using SRAM’s CX1 single ring drivetrain.

The indents for a derailleur are an unused holdover. © Christopher Langer

The indents for a derailleur are an unused holdover. © Christopher Langer

Another oddity is BMC’s cable routing choices. The company clearly made some clean decisions when opting for internal hydraulic routing. The frame seems to have been designed with Di2 in mind, as the external routing for the mechanical rear derailleur appears comparatively last-minute.
The frame is beautifully crafted and Di2-ready. The hydaulic cables are internal, but what is the rear deraileur cable doing next to the bottom tube? © Christopher Langer

The frame is beautifully crafted and Di2-ready. The hydraulic cables are internal, but what is the rear derailleur cable doing next to the bottom tube? © Christopher Langer

The hydraulic is sent down the head tube into the fork. Unlike many brands, such as Focus, Giant, and Van Dessel, BMC is currently opting to use quick releases rather than thru-axles. The 2014-5 season should be a key year in determining which system is preferred on the race course and in the mechanic’s pit. According to the BMC website, 140mm to 160mm rotors can be used on this model. We have yet to see if some of these details will change, and we have to wonder if some of these decisions (such as the quick release) are still a carryover from the ACE design process of the SLR01, or are conscious decisions by BMC when approaching the sport of cyclocross.
The brake cables run internally through the fork. © Christopher Langer

The brake cables run internally through the fork. © Christopher Langer

Excluding the fork, derailleur hanger, cable guides and seat clamp, BMC’s claimed weight of their frame comes to 980g.

Vital Specs:
DTi cable routing, compatible with mechanical and electronic groupsets
Frame weight: 1100 g including all hardware, size 54 cm Hardware includes: derailleur hanger, cable guides and seat clamp
Disc Brake Postmount 140mm (rotor size 140mm only)
BB86 Shimano press-fit bottom bracket
1-1/8” to 1-1/2” tapered steerer tube
Disc Brake Postmount 140mm (max rotor size 160mm)
27.2 mm diameter seatpost, standard offset 3 mm, also available with 18 mm and 30 mm offset
Sizing: 48cm, 51 cm, 54cm, 57cm, 60cm

For more information: BMC-racing.com

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