Mechanical Mondays: Tagging Your Gear (So You Get it Back!)

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Silver Sharpie helps me hang onto my gear © Dave Drumm

Silver Sharpie helps me hang onto my gear © Dave Drumm

If you’re chomping at the bit to get ready for cyclocross, or you’re in the middle of a mountain or road season, this week’s tip is simple but incredibly effective.

Between the weather and course variability, heading to a cyclocross race usually involves schlepping and keeping track of a lot of clothing and gear in general. This week’s Mechanical Mondays feature falls under the low-tech banner, but it’s one that could pay off with better gear management and perhaps a faster pit exchange.

by Dave Drumm

Cyclocross is a sport that requires a wide variety of equipment. Each week, we load our cars to the breaking point with trainers, wheels, tools, buckets, pumps, and clothes. We carry enough stuff to outfit a small army. Our race days are filled with distractions and keeping track of all that stuff can become an issue, especially for an amateur racer that doesn’t have the luxury of a handler who takes care of all the little details. We place our spare wheels in the pit during the race that runs prior to our own, so that we can get in a good warm up. Then, we leave our thermal jackets on the fence at the start and trust that they’ll be there when we’re finished.

After a hard 45 or 60 minute race, typically we’ll focus on getting warm and fed right away, and more often than not we’re a little out of sorts after torturing ourselves. It’s not uncommon to forget or misplace some items from our race-day equipment pile.

Writing your name on your equipment and clothing is a simple way to make sure you get it back in the event that you forget something at the venue. In my tool kit I keep two Sharpies, one silver and one black. Everything I bring to the races has my name on it somewhere.

A couple pennies on zipties could help you hang onto that wheel-and make for faster pit stops. © Dave Drumm

A couple pennies on zipties could help you hang onto that wheel–and make for faster pit stops. © Dave Drumm

All of my clothing has my name written on the inside of the collar. This is a simple trick from summer camp, but I didn’t start using it again until Gloucester in 2006, when there were 20 people staying in the HUP house, and most of us were teammates. Laundry sorting was a trying experience. My jackets, vests, legwarmers all have my name and cell phone number because these are the items that usually get dumped at the start line and, more often than not, these are the things I forget about. It’s a very good idea to put this information on your trainer and floor pump as well – cyclocross racers are a nice group, and we regularly let people borrow these expensive items.

The pit is an easy place to lose track of costly gear. In particular, it’s a really good idea to put your name on your spare wheels. I write my last name on the sidewall of my clinchers with a Silver sharpie, tubulars get black. Another really good tip that will help you find your wheels quickly during the heat of a third lap wheel change is to mark your hubs by placing a brightly colored zip tie around the center of the front and rear hubs. You can purchase multi-color packs of zip ties at your local hardware store for a few bucks. How many Ksyrium wheels with Michelin Muds are in the pit? How many of those have a bright orange stripe on the hub? It’s a simple trick that will help you find your wheels when you need them and also help prevent someone else from taking your wheels by mistake.

I hope you find these pointers useful!

 

 

Cyclocross Magazine, Issue 22, Print and digital subscriptionsHave you subscribed yet? You're missing out if not. Get all-original content and your cyclocross fix throughout the year with a subscription and Issue 23 back copy, with features on Lars van der Haar, Jonathan Page, Elle Anderson and more!
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