First Look: The New 2014 Ridley X-Night Disc Cyclocross Bike

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The new, lighter, lower and plusher 2014 Ridley XNight, now available with disc brakes.

The new, lighter, lower and plusher 2014 Ridley XNight, now available with disc brakes.

The new 2014 Ridley X-Night Disc cyclocross model made its debut today at FrostBike, and we’ve got a few images of the new bike. The X-Night Disc is, as its name implies, a disc brake model of the same frame Belgian cyclocross stars Klaas Vantornout and Kevin Pauwels rode in Louisville, with Vantornout finishing just seconds behind 2013 World Champion Sven Nys.

The new X-Night frames are noted to be as much as 550g lighter than the older X-Nights (some of which is offset by a seatpost).  The new models also feature a lower bottom bracket. The most noticeable feature compared to the older X-Nights we saw in the pit is the lack of an integrated seatmast in favor of a traditional round 27.2mm post. Also noticeable is the use of thin, separate bridged seatstays instead of a wishbone arrangement. The stays are said to better absorb vibration from the ’cross course.

Klaas Vantornout riding his canti version of the 2014 Ridley X-Night carbon cyclocross bike. © Clifford Lee

Klaas Vantornout riding his canti version of the 2014 Ridley X-Night carbon cyclocross bike. © Clifford Lee

As the flagship model from the Belgian brand, it’s surprising to see more affordable workhorse Shimano Ultegra and 105 componentry on the complete bike offering, but it’s to keep the pro-level bike from reaching unobtainable price levels. The MSRP for the Shimano Ultegra and 105 disc-equipped rig is $4,695 — certainly still a lot of coin for most of us, but also a Belgian National Championship-worthy frame.

Klaas Vantornout's cantilever 2014 Ridley X-Night cyclocross bike, ready for the Belgian National Champion. © Clifford Lee

Klaas Vantornout’s cantilever 2014 Ridley X-Night cyclocross bike, ready for the Belgian National Champion. © Clifford Lee

The last Ridley we looked at was last summer’s 2013 Ridley X-Fire Carbon cyclocross bike, which hit dealers later in July. For comparison’s sake, a non-PF30 version with SRAM Rival was also available for $2495, while a SRAM Red X-Night came in at $4095.

2014 Ridley X-Night Ultegra Disc Specs:

  • Shimano Ultegra shifters and rear derailleur
  • Shimano 105 on the front derailleur, cassette and chain
  • Hayes CX-5 disc brakes
  • FSA SLK Light 46-36 crankset
  • Reynolds Solace disc wheels
  • Challenge Grifo tires
  • Prologo Zero II saddle
  • 4ZA Cirrus stem, handlebars and seatpost
Hayes CX-5 disc brakes work with Reynolds Solace disc wheels on the new Ridley X-Night.

Hayes CX-5 disc brakes slow the Reynolds Solace disc wheels on the new Ridley X-Night.

Photos of the 2014 Ridley X-Night Cantilever Model:

 

Ridley's flagship 2014 Cantilever Brake X-Night cyclocross bike. photo: courtesy

Ridley’s flagship 2014 Cantilever Brake X-Night cyclocross bike. photo: courtesy

Ridley's flagship 2014 Cantilever Brake X-Night cyclocross bike. photo: courtesy

Ridley’s flagship 2014 X-Night cyclocross bike now comes with both canti and disc brake options. photo: courtesy

Ridley's flagship 2014 Cantilever Brake X-Night cyclocross bike. photo: courtesy

Wide downtube still remains, but there’s more mud clearance and a lower bottom bracket. photo: courtesy

 

 

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4 comments
MarcDettman
MarcDettman

It's lighter, but it's heavier. It has disc brakes.

MarcDettman
MarcDettman

How much lower is the bottom bracket that the old design? Good idea on their part - those bikes were tall. Is the lower-head tube larger, matching more modern bike designs? Can't quite tell in the photos. Good idea to keep the canti-version.

lwaldman
lwaldman

I know I sound terribly old-fashioned (maybe even cheap).  It's expensive to switch over two bikes and multiple sets of wheels to disc.  And I still wonder why Euro pros aren't using them yet.  I get it that they stop better, something that we'd all love, but for me, financing my own racing, it still seems like an incredibly costly convesion.

mtravisdawson
mtravisdawson

@lwaldman, truthfully, you should keep your cantis for the sake of budget. When you've worn out enough of your components to warrant change-over, go for it. Meanwhile, racers who are just building their equipment cache will be buying into disc brakes first. You might also consider selling off your canti stuff to other old racers who can't let go!

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