Raleigh Updates RX 1.0 and RX 2.0, Returns with RXW Women’s and Tamland Gravel Bikes

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Raleigh's RXW 1.0 Women's model features a mix of SRAM Apex, Rival and Force. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh’s RXW 1.0 Women’s model features a mix of SRAM Apex, Rival and Force. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh didn’t just launch a new RXS singlespeed at Sea Otter this year—the company also revamped both the high-end carbon models and their aluminum lower-tier offerings for 2015. Prices are expected to stay roughly the same as the 2014 lineups, but no MSRPs have been confirmed. Upgrades for the year include changes to wheels and tires, as well as to the component groups, and an overall weight reduction across the board.

The Raleigh RXW 1.0 Women’s bike is back in its third iteration (the 2014 model was reviewed back in Issue 23 of Cyclocross Magazine) with some tweaks and component changes. It features a mix of SRAM Apex, Rival and Force, with the same FSA cranks as past models.

Raleigh 2015 cyclocross bikes includes the RX 1.0 and RX 2.0 Women's models, with cantilever brakes. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh 2015 cyclocross bikes includes the RX 1.0 and RX 2.0 Women’s models, with cantilever brakes. © Cyclocross Magazine

The Women’s model now comes in RXW and RXW Comp models, both with cantilever brakes. Why canti brakes? Raleigh’s experience with the Raleigh-Clement team has been that the women racers prefer the weight savings over disc brakes, and because they’re often lighter, may not require the extra power of discs. Still, Raleigh’s Brian Fornes suggests that this may be the last year of canti women’s models.

Available in sizes 48cm through 56cm, the  silver RXW Comp weighs in at 19.5 pounds, and is made with 6061 Double Butted Alloy with tapered head and seat tubes.  A flat oval down tube and seatstay with a PF30 bottom bracket complete the frame build, and the bike is kitted out with SRAM Force 11 speed with FSA Gossamer Pro Cranks 46x36t chainrings while stopping is handled with TRP RevoX alloy canti brakes. American Classic TCX rim brake wheels are 26mm wide and are paired with Clement Crusade PDX tires.

The RXW is available in the same sizes as the RXW Comp and gains just a pound for the same size. The frame remains the same, as does the drivetrain. The braking, however, is swapped from TRP to Tektro CR710 canti brakes, and the American Classic wheelset is replaced by Weinmann Momentum SL 23mm wide rims with Novatec Sealed bearing hubs and Clement MXP tires.

Raleigh's 2014 RX 2.0 won our Editors' Choice Award for best affordable bike, and moves to Clement tires and TRP Spyre brakes. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh’s 2014 RX 2.0 won our Editors’ Choice Award for best affordable bike, and moves to Clement tires and TRP Spyre brakes. © Cyclocross Magazine

The Raleigh 2014 RX 2.0 won our Editors’ Choice Award for best affordable bike, and the changes for this year might make this an even better version! Unlike the women’s models and the RX 1.0, the 2.0 is disc brake-only, with Shimano 105 11 speed components. The crankset stays the same with the FSA Gossamer Pro Cranks 46x36t chainrings, and stopping power is now courtesy of TRP Spyre dual piston mechanical disc brakes. The build is finished off with Weinmann Impulse 23mm wide rims with Novatec sealed bearing hubs shod with Clement MXP tires.

Raleigh's 2015 RX 1.0 is the sleeper value, with SRAM Rival and Force, Tektro cantis and an FSA Gossamer crank, for around $1550. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh’s 2015 RX 1.0 is the sleeper value, with SRAM Rival and Force, Tektro cantis and an FSA Gossamer crank, for around $1550. © Cyclocross Magazine

The RX1.0 shares the same components and frame materials as the women’s version, the only differences are in geometry and sizes available (52cm to 62cm), which accounts for the added pound in weight over the RX 2.0.

Raleigh 2015 Tamland, a late release in 2013, will come back unchanged for 2015. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh 2015 Tamland, a late release in 2013, will come back unchanged for 2015. © Cyclocross Magazine

The popular late-release 2014 Tamland gravel bikes we unveiled last year at Dealer Camp returns unchanged for this year. The Reynolds 631 steel gravel bike sold out in 2013, but should be in stores again shortly. Make sure you’re subscribed for Issue 25′s review of the Tamland 2, a bike designed more for gravel than ’cross, but with a ’cross-y enough style that racers may want to consider it as a double-duty machine. The company also will bring back the Tamland 1 gravel bike, with its more affordable component build.

Missed some of the latest cyclocross and gravel bikes, tires and gear from Sea Otter? Check out all of our tech goodies from Sea Otter 2014. It keeps growing.

 

 

Cyclocross Magazine, Issue 22, Print and digital subscriptionsHave you subscribed yet? You're missing out if not. Get all-original content and your cyclocross fix throughout the year with a subscription and Issue 23 back copy, with features on Lars van der Haar, Jonathan Page, Elle Anderson and more!
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1 comments
craigmacintyre
craigmacintyre

While I think the argument used for canti's on women's bikes is a bit miopic I have to say that for RACING cross in all but the worst conditions, I prefer canti's.  On gravel, it is a toss up with the nod going to discs for high speed dry conditions (I have blown through disc pads on a 100 mile gravel grinder - nothing like NO brakes on rough gravel descents in swampy conditions to make you appreciate canti's).

I will actually rue the day that canti's are gone on cross bikes ... I guess I am a luddite

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