Seattle-based Raleigh USA offered just one cyclocross production model in 2011, with its value-oriented Shimano-equipped 105 RX 1.0 cyclocross bike. The company technically also offered a limited edition singlespeed frame, centered around its support behind the 2010 SSCXWC, but you weren’t likely to find it at your local bike shop. Want a high-end bike bike? You were out of luck. Want disc brakes? An entry-level machine? Raleigh sent you elsewhere.

That’s all changing with the 2012 Raleigh line-up.

The steel, disc-brake equipped Furley brings steel, disc brakes and one gear to the Raleigh 2012 Cyclocross bike line-up. © Cyclocross Magazine

The Furley brings steel, disc brakes and one gear to the Raleigh 2012 Cyclocross bike line-up. © Cyclocross Magazine

The Seattle company now joins its neighbor and competitor Redline as having the most cyclocross models on the market, but differentiates from Redline by offering two women’s models instead of the kid’s models.

Spare spokes are included as a chainstay protector on the Furley and Roper steel singlespeed bikes. © Cyclocross Magazine

Spare spokes are included as a chainstay protector on the Furley and Roper steel singlespeed bikes. © Cyclocross Magazine

For 2012, Raleigh will bring cyclocross down to $820, with the 4130 Chromoly BB30 and disc-brake equipped Furley Singlespeed. The bike features Promax 720RA disc brakes and 160mm rotors, a FSA BB30 Eccentric bottom bracket, and because the same frame is offered with gears in the company’s Roper model, there’s a rear derailleur hanger in case you decide singlespeed is not for you. The Roper model (the naming scheme is from Three’s Company) brings Shimano 105 and R505 disc brakes with a FSA Gossamer Pro compact crankset to create a versatile bike that offers cyclocrossers, commuters and roadies a viable, affordable option at $1500 MSRP.

The Raleigh RX1-W cyclocross bike for women. © Cyclocross Magazine

The Raleigh RX1-W cyclocross bike for women. © Cyclocross Magazine

Raleigh keeps its aluminum RX1.0, but switches back to SRAM with the Apex group, and offers a women’s RX1.0 W model for the fairer gender. With a slightly lower bottom bracket, shorter top tube, and slightly slacker head angle, the women’s model should be an attractive option for newer women’s racers. The RX1.0 retails for $1650, but if that’s too steep, Raleigh caters to the entry-level crowd with a $1100 9-speed Sora-equipped RX and RX-W cyclocross bikes. For the price, it’s impressive to see an Easton carbon EC70X fork andBB30, and the new Tektro CR7210 handles stopping. True cyclocross gearing with a 36/46t chainring set and a 12-26t cassette demonstrate that Raleigh really does intend for these bikes to be ready for cyclocross racers, rather than just commuters.

The carbon RXC is the carbon version of the RX1.0 with SRAM Apex. © Cyclocross Magazine

The carbon RXC is the carbon version of the RX1.0 with SRAM Apex. © Cyclocross Magazine

As we’ve previously reported, Raleigh also embraces carbon for 2012, with two models, the RXC Pro and the RXC.  The $5000, SRAM-equipped Pro comes with Avid Shorty Ultimate cyclocross brakes, Cole C38 carbon clincher wheels, SRAM shifters and front derailleur, and a SRAM Red rear derailleur. The frame weighs in at around 1050 grams, and paired with a carbon ENVE cyclocross fork and the Cole carbon clinchers, the bike caters to the gram-shaving crowd in the major components.  The $2400 Pro brings carbon to more of the masses, and is basically the RX1.0 with a carbon frame.

Stay tuned for a full gallery of these bikes. Photo highlights below: